Tag Archives: Baby Boomers

How the Baby-Boomers Wrecked Music

I’ve written about the power of the boomers in shaping the political agenda, but it seems that that’s not the only marketplace in which they’ve been exercising their clout.

James Harkin is a “futurologist” and in his book, Niche, he describes how as the general audience declined, the companies he worked for became interested in particular demographics. After chasing teenagers and young people, companies realised that the money was in catering to the baby-boomers.

“Bugger youth culture, went the new mantra: a generation that once promised to die before it got old was now living out a middle youth, and it was up for us to help them feel good about it. Only two years after I had been hired to write fevered reports about the temperature of global youth, I was working for ad agencies and think tanks in New York and London to find out who older people really were … whole days flew by in a research haze of Steppenwolf songs, day spas, and Stannah Stairlifts”. [pg 69]

One business that made the shift was the music industry. In the early 2000s, it had become obsessed with teenagers investing in genres like rap, hip-hop and teeny pop just as the teenage audience was working out how to download things for free. By 2004 in the UK, more middle-aged people were buying albums than teenagers. That was all soon to change, though how the shift begun took everyone a bit by surprise.

“In retrospect, it would be easy to blame everything that happened next on a twenty-three-year-old jazz-piano crooner. In February 2002 Norah Jones, the daughter of Ravi Shankar, had released a folksy album called Come Away With Me. The album won some admiring reviews but no one expected it to sell very well, and it duly chugged along at the bottom of the charts. As the year progressed, however, sales began to quicken. The album seemed to have become ethe unofficial mood music for coffee shops and bookstores frequented by a discerning older clientele. Despite a lack of publicity, it was obvious that Norah Jones had somehow acquired a devoted army of fans. … By February 2003, a full year after its release, Come Away With Me has ascended to No. 1 on the Billboard album chart, where it remained for three weeks. In the same month it took five Grammy awards, including pop album of the year … it sold an incredible six million copies – most of them, a little research reveal, to music lovers at least two decades older than the singer herself.” [pg 67]

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Jilted Generation

Probably the book which has angered, inspired and politicised me most in the last six months is Jilted Generation by Ed Howker & Shiv Malik.

Howker and Malik argue that the baby-boomer generation – those born between 1945 and 1965 – have enjoyed an uniquely privileged set of circumstances growing up – a set of circumstances which contrasts with the shoddy inheritance left to the generation after.

  • Housing. As well as the sell off of council housing – a massive windfall for the baby-boomers – baby-boomers only had to borrow (on average) three times their salary to buy their two-up, two-down with a garden. Their debt was also diminished by high inflation rates. Since then the decline in house building, strict planning laws, and population growth have caused house prices to rocket – making baby-boomers rich, and pricing the young out of the market.
  • Higher education. Boomers not only got their higher education for free, but once  gained, their degrees were highly valued in the job market. Starting wages were comparably high. Today young people face £9000 a year tuition fees, a jobs regime that requires many young people to work for free on  ‘internships‘, a lack of apprenticeships, and an economy that leaves one in five young people unemployed.
  • Pensions. Boomers joined companies with final-salary schemes. Now most companies don’t have ANY pension provision. The ones left are risky ‘defined contribution’ schemes, paid later and requiring bigger contributions.
  • Dismal government finances. We have a national debt of £867 billion, and that’s not including the PFI schemes and public sector pension liabilities that sit off the balance sheet. All the fuss at the moment about reducing the deficit (basically the nation’s overdraft) doesn’t touch the underlying debt.
  • And there’s probably half a dozen other things I’ve forgotten

These arguments have been set out elsewhere. David Willetts (now the higher education minister) in Pinch, calculates that with baby-boomers entering the job market later than the generation before (after going to University), whilst retiring in their 60s (earlier than those who will follow), combined with their long life expectancy, means they will take out 118% of what they put in to the welfare state.

What Howker and Malik do which is different

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